The Self-Sufficient Gardener



John Seymour, The Self-Sufficient Gardener
Main Street Books | 1979 | ISBN: 038514671X, 0385146701, 0571112129 | 256 pages | File type: PDF | 51 mb
Summary: The ultimate vegetable gardening book
Rating: 5

My grandfather gave me this book years ago, and I consider it my vegetable gardening bible. I second what other reviewers have saidif I could only have one book, this would be it, and I can't believe that it is out of print! I haven't looked at Seymour's newer book (I'm sure it's great, too) but I cherish my aged, tattered paperback copy of this book and will always consider it my first point of reference.



Summary: This Book should still be in print!
Rating: 5

I've checked this book out of my library so many times I've lost count. It is absolutely the best book on gardening I've ever read.

Gardening: The introdution explains the fundamentals of nature's cycles and the ecology of gardening. The edible parts of plants are explained. There are then several pages of (beautiful!) illustrations of vegetables, fruits herbs. The cycle of seasons is discussed in the next chapter and it shows illustrations of what your garden might look like during each season and what gardening chores you perform during the different seasons. The essentials of good gardening are discussed in depth in the fourth chapter, such as soil treatment, composting, propagation, grafting pruning, controlling pests, harvesting storing, and the deep bed method of gardening.

Growing: Chapters 5-7 describe how to grow vegetables, fruits herbs. What I like most is that in addition to explaining a little of the history of the plants, and how to grow them and propagate them, it also explains how to harvest and preserve the food that results. It also explains how to grow unusual food, like kumquats and quince, in addition to all the usual things you'd expect. Greenhouse growing is discussed in chapter 8.

Preserving: Chapter 9 describes how to preserve all the food that results from your garden. It explains the fundamentals of why food rots and the basic methods of preserving (salting, drying, pickling, canning, jamming, freezing). When making jam, this book assumes you get pectin by adding lemons or apples, not by running to the store to buy a packet of it. It shows how to make a solar dehydrator to dry your food, and which foods are best preserved using each method. It also goes into details on how to make wine, cider, and mead (honey wine).

Miscellaneous: The tenth chapter describes a miscellany of self-sufficient gardening topics, such as raising animals like chickens, ducks, geese, pigeons, rabbits, and bees. Water drainage, terracing, garden paths, hedges, fences, sheds, and caring for tools are all discussed briefly.

If you can get a copy of this book, keep it! It's a jewel.



Summary: If I could have only one book
Rating: 5

This is the best single reference for growing vegetable, herbs and fruits, with additional advice on preserving food. It contains in concise form valuable information on soil requirements, plant food, and diseases as well as other horticultural information. It is a gem. And so beautiful to look at!



Summary: This Book should still be in print!
Rating: 5

I've checked this book out of my library so many times I've lost count. It is absolutely the best book on gardening I've ever read.

Gardening: The introdution explains the fundamentals of nature's cycles and the ecology of gardening. The edible parts of plants are explained. There are then several pages of (beautiful!) illustrations of vegetables, fruits herbs. The cycle of seasons is discussed in the next chapter and it shows illustrations of what your garden might look like during each season and what gardening chores you perform during the different seasons. The essentials of good gardening are discussed in depth in the fourth chapter, such as soil treatment, composting, propagation, grafting pruning, controlling pests, harvesting storing, and the deep bed method of gardening.

Growing: Chapters 5-7 describe how to grow vegetables, fruits herbs. What I like most is that in addition to explaining a little of the history of the plants, and how to grow them and propagate them, it also explains how to harvest and preserve the food that results. It also explains how to grow unusual food, like kumquats and quince, in addition to all the usual things you'd expect. Greenhouse growing is discussed in chapter 8.

Preserving: Chapter 9 describes how to preserve all the food that results from your garden. It explains the fundamentals of why food rots and the basic methods of preserving (salting, drying, pickling, canning, jamming, freezing). When making jam, this book assumes you get pectin by adding lemons or apples, not by running to the store to buy a packet of it. It shows how to make a solar dehydrator to dry your food, and which foods are best preserved using each method. It also goes into details on how to make wine, cider, and mead (honey wine).

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